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Asking for a Raise: You Know What to Do

You have been working hard, making an impact on your organization, and you think the time is right to ask for a raise. But, how can you deliver this message when you are consistently asking for money for causes that seem to be in greater need than yourself?
What is the best approach for your evaluation that leads to greater compensation?

I would suggest that you use the same approach you use every day on behalf of your organization.
 
Create a Case Statement for yourself.
 
When preparing to ask for a raise, a well-developed case should include the following:
 
Mission
 
There is nothing wrong with stating your commitment, future goals, and desire for success. Having a vision for yourself, how that integrates into the organization, and builds trust between you and management.
 
Needs and Data
 
While emotions play a strong role in an employee's desire or need for a raise, management will be more receptive when you can demonstrate that need with facts. Look through your records and document the number of quality contacts you had with donors which have legitimately moved the relationship forward. Keep an “Applause” folder which includes a working document of contributions to date, demonstrated process improvements, key leadership relationships and any contributions made outside of your defined role.
 
Should metrics include the number of submissions made in a fiscal year(s). How many of those proposals were funded? Report the percentage of growth over a determined time.
 
It's hard to argue with results. Make your case with sound data.
 
What Makes You Unique
 
Give some thought to the unique qualities you offer your organization. Analyze the collected data to identify your strengths. What skill set do you possess that continues to move the needle in a positive direction? Have you received additional mentoring from colleagues? Attended additional training which provided more expertise? Cite specific examples. Demonstrate how you add value and the long-term difference you can make for your organization.
 
Align with Priorities
 
Timing is everything. Several “big wins” might provide an opportunity to discuss advancement with your supervisor. You might also consider using the annual budgeting process as the best time to make your case.
 
Research Competitive Salaries
 
Gather information about company and industry-wide salaries that you can use to inform your requested salary figures. Propose to management a precise salary figure and use your research to substantiate it.
 
Sustainability
 
Be confident and communicate that an investment in you will make a long-term impact on the organization and the community it serves. Employee retention is important to the organization's bottom line. Turnover can cost an organization between $15,000 and $50,000. A well-researched raise request will mitigate that figure and create benefit for you and your employer that is long lasting. 
 
 
So, if you believe your performance deserves to be compensated, utilize your skills to develop a Case Statement which conveys a passionate and persuasive narrative that speaks directly to your value and long-term commitment to the organization. Support the argument with facts and conviction.
 
What will your Case Statement say about you?
 
Shelly Borders, MA, is Assistant Director, Foundation Relations, at the University of North Texas Health Science Center in Fort Worth, Texas.

GPC Competencies:
07. Knowledge of practices and services that raise the level of professionalism of grant developers;
09. Ability to write a convincing case for funding


 

Comments

 
By: Barbara Van Handel
On: 06/06/2018 08:08:36
Having done all that with my organization, talking to my supervisor who said she agreed with me, I gave her all my research. I spoke to HR and gave them all my research. That did not get me anywhere. The only option is to leave the organization. Now strongly considering this. When you provide research and facts, ask how your range was determined, and are given no answers or consideration, you come to the conclusion, you and your work are not appreciated. SAD.
 
By: J Garpue Lieway
On: 07/12/2018 11:24:59
Is it appropriate to request salary increase using your approach when the company provides a merit based salary increase? I received 2% merit based increases in three of the five years I have worked. I still want to ask for 10% and see what I get because 2% does not commensurate with the exponentially rising cost of living in my mid-western city.

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