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Archive November 2018

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Fanning The Flames Between Conferences


The cold November rain, nagging feelings of emptiness and a fistful of hotel and restaurant receipts points me to only one diagnosis—it’s post GPA Conference blues that I’m feeling now!
 

The Turkey Doesn’t Make the Meal: Giving Thanks All Year Round


Few artists are so consistently associated with the American experience more often than Norman Rockwell. The iconic painting, “Freedom from Want,” shows people gathered around a table filled with food and empty plates, as the turkey is lowered onto its place on the table. This image continues to be used to express and comment on American values (I recommend the parodies that add iPhones or replace the people with comic-book characters).

 

Is One of Your Professional Goals for 2019 to Serve as a Grant Reviewer?


The pile of proposals to read was daunting. A caffeinated beverage was in one hand, a yellow highlighter and pen in the other. I sat at the dining room table in my apartment wondering what I had signed up for. In the end, some proposals took multiple reads to understand the purpose of the funding and were marked up with question marks and highlighter. Other proposals were crystal clear and were only marked up with exclamation marks of excitement in the margin.
 

Vulnerability as Strength – Deepening Relationships with Funders


Revealing vulnerabilities about your organization or project in a proposal can feel risky. But remember, reviewers and program officers are people too. A foundation program officer once told me “What we know about trust and relationships is rooted in transparency. And when you don’t have that or don’t share a little bit of yourself in a relationship, you won’t increase closeness, you’ll increase distance.” Sound familiar?

A Day in the Life of a Mental Health Grant Writer


Every morning, I drive down a street in a not-so-nice neighborhood populated with people walking its sidewalks who aren’t popular…homeless, poor, unemployed, on drugs, some “out of their minds.”