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Archive August 2018

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Self-Plagiarism in Grant Writing


When I began my service on the GPA Ethics Committee, a quick refresher on the Code of Ethics was in order. A particular concept jumped off the page at me: self-plagiarism.  I had a vague notion of its meaning, but struggled to wrap my head around how it might apply to my work. If I had this question after working in grant development for over twelve years, I figured others might benefit from further discussion on the topic as well.
 

Emerging Trends in Healthcare Grants


Today, many suffer from lack of access to mental and physical healthcare as well as inadequate health and wellness education. The result is that about 1 in 5 adults in the U.S. struggle with mental illness (Newsweek, 2014) and over 45 percent of the U.S. population has at least one chronic health condition (Center for Disease Control, 2013). To assist in improving health care in the U.S., especially among underserved and low-income populations, federal government agencies and private foundations offer a substantial number of healthcare grant opportunities.

 

Do Not Skimp on the Details - Let Your Budget Tell the Story


Did you know that some reviewers will look at the budget in a grant proposal before any other part? That means before they see your heartwarming pictures; read your amazing impact story; or review your data, and project description, they will focus on the story your budget tells. Does it tell the whole story? Don’t skimp on the details – use the budget to wow the reviewers!
 

It is Not About You, but the Sirens Can Make You Feel Otherwise


“Mrs. Hurst, your daughter had a medical emergency. Please get here as quickly as possible.”
 

How to Avoid Bias in Grantwriting

Recent events in the news have placed a spotlight on the issue of bias.
 
Bias is defined as the cause to feel or show inclination or prejudice for or against someone or something.
 
As humans, we all possess personal bias which has informed us over our lifetimes through personal experiences with our families, friends, and peers.
 
As grant writers, it is our responsibility to detach from that personal bias to make a well-informed case for funding which leads to success for our organization.

GPA Events & Volunteer Update - August 2018


Thanks to all of our GPA Volunteers!